Sunday, November 25, 2007

Wandering Spirit and Pirate Treasure

I was reading at http://lifeonmull.blogspot.com/gspot.com/ "The Wanderer Returns" and the mention of taking their boat to explore the various coves reminded me of my summers by the shore on Kent Island, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland. My grandmother co-owned a trawling boat that would take clients out for a day's fishing. My cousins and I were often put into the trustworthy hands of our gran for time on end...and we became 'mates on the ship' not minding at all whether it was 'get to the mopping, swabby', or 'bring me the bait pail'! When it was time on our own, we would often take the row boat and be gone, exploring up and down the marina. My Gran instilled in us a sense of adventure and imagination, and would take the boat to different areas in and around Kent Island...looking for 'Pirate Treasure'! We would snorkle in the shallows which gave me an interest to later become a Scuba Diver. Her friend was equally fun and devilish, and didn't like the
sailboats because they sometimes cut across the fishing lines (if I'm remembering correctly)...he would have us kids yell out to the sailboats as they passed by us: 'odin, odin, stop the wind and change the tides'! This was where I also learned of the crab bucket, and the tendancy of what human nature can be like sometimes. You see, you never have to put a lid on a crab bucket. At first glance you would think the crabs would all climb out and escape. But they don't; as soon as one crab almost makes it to the top, the other crabs grab him and pull him back down. This was interesting to observe, and a lesson to learn (on how not to be!) I think nature has a lot to teach us, if we only stop for a moment to watch and listen!! :)
"Look at that sea, ...all silver and shadow and vision of things not seen. We couldn't enjoy its loveliness any more if we had millions of dollars and ropes of diamonds."
-L.Montgomery, 'Anne of Green Gables'
Though most of my holiday time is now spent in the mountains with my husband and children,
....I don't think the sea can ever be taken out of my soul!!


5 comments:

George A. said...

His Girl Firday's quote: "This was where I also learned of the crab bucket, and the tendency of what human nature can be like sometimes. You see, you never have to put a lid on a crab bucket. At first glance you would think the crabs would all climb out and escape. But they don't; as soon as one crab almost makes it to the top, the other crabs grab him and pull him back down."

This is an interesting comparison to life in the “big town”. Those that achieve are quickly focused on by others people who want to tear them down. I am not sure if it is because they just do not feel good about themselves and don’t want others to succeed or are just hateful.

I have experienced this at work and so has a friend of mine.

I like your story, thanks.

Talking Bear said...

Great story HGF. Childhood can be a lot of fun, and great "look back" when life's crab buckets get us down. That must have been a real special time for you. :)

His Girl Friday said...

Hi George,
thanks for commenting!
I'm sorry for your work experiences; and you're right on both counts, in many cases being successful can mean even more 'unfriendlys' in the area. :/

Hi TB,
thanks, yes, my summers by the shore were some of the best...it's interesting that the lesson of the crab bucket stuck so well in memory!

Fuchsia Girl said...

What a lovely childhood memory to share with us - it sounds wonderful - very 'Swallows & Amazons' or 'Famous Five'!

What a pity that many children today don't enjoy similar adventures as we did back then!!

storyteller said...

Hi HFG
I enjoyed the reflection and the photos. Reading it reminded me of the years I took my 5th graders on an overnight field trip aboard the Brig Pilgrim in Dana Point Harbor. We'd study for about 6 weeks ahead of time, learning to tie knots ... sing sea chanteys ... understand the "lingo" & "bell time" ... and a host of other things. Then we'd board the bus with our duffle bags (divided into crews with different responsibilties (even a galley crew to do the cooking & cleaning up), ready for an adventure.

Upon arrival we were greeted by a "shouting captain" wondering where his 1st mate found such a "grubby bunch of sailors" ... rowed ourselves out to the ship in crews, and settled in for the duration. We experienced about 18 hours or so of fairly constant activity (even standing two hours of "guard duty" throughout the night & waking the next shift without disturbing the captain's sleep) as well as swabbing the decks before we disembarked. Let's hear it for mem'ries everyone :)

I notice YOU'VE got PacMan also. Isn't it fun what's out there? Thanks for sharing.
Hugs and blessings,